Jabiru engines

Downunder

Well-Known Member
#81
I have had a LiFePO4 starting battery for over a year now now and it weighs about 1kg. Taking about 5kg off the nose wheel is great.
The battery is only used for starting the engine and is disconnected from the alternator well before takeoff.
Interesting! A starter only battery. Do you only charge it from a 240v "off aircraft" charger?
What battery, battery capacity do you have inflight?
 

Oscar

Well-Known Member
#82
A bit more information on weights, and a correction: the CAMit flywheel is, as JJ said, lighter than the Jabiru one. ( Mine is actually a spider-centre Jab. one, not a proper CAMit one - my bad memory there!) And the newer alternator is apparently same installed weight as the Jab. charging set-up, with all the advantages of the CAMit one - a no-brainer, I reckon!

A set of four cht and clamp-type egt sensors plus cables and bracketry, weighs 540 grammes: 135 grammes/cylinder.. Standard Jab is one CHT: I don't have a weight for that, but I'd estimate around 50 grammes ( since the egts have a s/s hose clamp).. So, for a six-cylinder, I reckon add 760 grammes on the engine.

The old standard Jabiru oil cooler adapter is 211 grammes with the O/P sender and the hose barbs attached. The CAMit TOCA, is 324 grammes. (assuming my kitchen scales are fairly accurate!)

The CAMit cylinder anti-corrosion oil injection system adds around 450 grammes approx., maybe a bit less.

So, yes a fully-optioned CAMit engine is going to be a some kgs heavier than a basic early-model equivalent Jab. engine, but I just can't see anything like 10 kgs - maybe half of that or so, for really quite a bit more 'kit' - all of it highly desireable, I reckon, for a good and faithful life.

HOWEVER : my estimate is based on adding what I can think of. It would be far more reliable if someone could remove their Jab. engine with all ancillaries, weigh it, and the weigh all the direct replacement parts for a CAE engine swap, so it's a true apples for apples comparison. CAMit has measurement gear of an accuracy that most of us can only dream about; I wouldn't doubt their advertised weights for a moment.
 
#83
A bit more information on weights, and a correction: the CAMit flywheel is, as JJ said, lighter than the Jabiru one. ( Mine is actually a spider-centre Jab. one, not a proper CAMit one - my bad memory there!) And the newer alternator is apparently same installed weight as the Jab. charging set-up, with all the advantages of the CAMit one - a no-brainer, I reckon!

A set of four cht and clamp-type egt sensors plus cables and bracketry, weighs 540 grammes: 135 grammes/cylinder.. Standard Jab is one CHT: I don't have a weight for that, but I'd estimate around 50 grammes ( since the egts have a s/s hose clamp).. So, for a six-cylinder, I reckon add 760 grammes on the engine.

The old standard Jabiru oil cooler adapter is 211 grammes with the O/P sender and the hose barbs attached. The CAMit TOCA, is 324 grammes. (assuming my kitchen scales are fairly accurate!)

The CAMit cylinder anti-corrosion oil injection system adds around 450 grammes approx., maybe a bit less.

So, yes a fully-optioned CAMit engine is going to be a some kgs heavier than a basic early-model equivalent Jab. engine, but I just can't see anything like 10 kgs - maybe half of that or so, for really quite a bit more 'kit' - all of it highly desireable, I reckon, for a good and faithful life.

HOWEVER : my estimate is based on adding what I can think of. It would be far more reliable if someone could remove their Jab. engine with all ancillaries, weigh it, and the weigh all the direct replacement parts for a CAE engine swap, so it's a true apples for apples comparison. CAMit has measurement gear of an accuracy that most of us can only dream about; I wouldn't doubt their advertised weights for a moment.
So really, with all the variables you mention, and the different locations of these components relative to the c/g datum, the only safe option, if undergoing an engine change, weigh both before and after the transplant.
 

facthunter

First Class Member
First Class Member
#84
If you are changing by calculation, you need weight and Cof G of the complete component for the calculation of the moment and the same for previous unit it replaced. If it's a fairly large amount it may require the relocation of something heavy like a battery, or a smaller weight further away near the tail. Adding weights near the extremities, can change aircraft handling characteristics like spinning. Because intentional spins are prohibited doesn't stop the problem being an issue.Nev
 

Camel

Well-Known Member
#85
Received today.

Hello Jabiru Fleet,

Exciting news.....

Engine Production of the Generation 4 2200 and 3300 engines at the Jabiru Factory at Bundaberg Airport is well underway. Our brand new CNC lathe is bolted down and working and a brand new CNC horizontal machining centre is on order and will be delivered at the end of March. Photos below of cylinder heads and barrels being machined on our vertical machining centre and Gen 4 3300 engine components ready for assembly along with pictures of the first shiny new Generation 4 2200 and 3300 engines.
We currently have a waiting list and are accepting orders and deposits for engines.




 

Bruce Tuncks

First Class Member
First Class Member
#86
That new Jabiru engine looks good Camel. Gosh I hope it is a winner.

Downunder, the battery I am using is a Hobbyking 8,400 mAh LiFePO4. It is connected just like the old Odyssey battery and gets charged from the Jabiru system just the same EXCEPT that I have a digital volt-meter on the panel and when the voltage has returned to 14.4 volts after starting, I then turn off the master switch.
This isolates the battery from the system.
In lieu of a battery, there are some big capacitors between the positive and earth busses in the instrument area. The alternator thinks that these capacitors are the battery, and the radio etc works from this source. So there is nothing for the main battery to do after starting the engine except to get back the energy taken out by the start before being switched out.
If the battery were to be left connected, it would be well and truly overcharged by the Jabiru alternator, where the regulator cuts out at about 15 volts.
A better system than mine would be to use a really good regulator, one which did not overcharge the battery. And there would need to be some individual cell protection for the battery as these LiFePO4 need balancing. ( I need to do this balancing with a model-plane charger about twice a year)
The next generation of planes will come with this stuff built in I bet.
My setup has worked ok for years now.
 
#87
Camel

What are the differences in this engine?..same pistons? same rings?..same valves and seats? throughbolts? How different is this engine from the previous version...we know it finally has Nikasil bores though
 

jetjr

Well-Known Member
#88
Looks like Gen 4 3300 is pretty much a Gen 3 with new heads and cylinders
Any word on where cases, cranks and other parts coming from?
 

jetjr

Well-Known Member
#96
Jabiru have the opportunity for a price reset in addition to having to find new manufacturers probably more expensive
If the have orders and wait lists there must be pricing
 

Camel

Well-Known Member
#97
Camel

What are the differences in this engine?..same pistons? same rings?..same valves and seats? throughbolts? How different is this engine from the previous version...we know it finally has Nikasil bores though
As a Jabiru owner I was sent a news letter, that's how I got the info, I'm not privileged or anything special.
 

jetjr

Well-Known Member
#99
Yeah among other benefits but it's very hard to get right in small batch production
If it's Nickasil "like" it may or may not have the same attributes
They are cast alloy cylinders anyway aren't they?
 
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